Thursday, May 2, 2013

POSTHASTE VS. DAVID EGAN



POSTHASTE VS. DAVID EGAN
By Dege Legg
as published in the May 2013 issue of The Ind Monthly. 

He’s a singer. A songwriter. A piano man. A family man. He’s even got his own Wikipedia entry. He’s David Egan. And he knows ancient secrets about the monolithic stones of Stonehenge that he’s not willing to share. Here are some other little known facts about Egan.  He once calculated the exact location of a dead star, using only a shoe horn. He does not play a keytar.  When asked to provide proof of God’s existence, Egan produced a Jew’s harp and proceeded to play Mountain’s “Mississippi Queen.”

Egan is a Louisiana treasure of song. In addition to fronting his own band and being a member of Lil Band O’Gold, Egan’s tunes have been covered by the likes of Solomon Burke, Irma Thomas, Joe Cocker, Percy Seldge, and many others. His albums Twenty Years of Trouble and You Don’t Know Your Mind are undeniable, scientific proof that Egan still has some creative fish to fry in the skillet pan of creativity. And he ain’t done yet! His new album promises to be a sacred cranial masterpiece full of high strokes, confident blokes, wiggling worms of mushy tokes.


1. History of Dave Egan in five words, more or less?
He seldom finishes what he...

2. Why Dave Egan musician, why not Dave Egan: bearded sorcerer or snake juggling preacher?
That Fortenbery fellow already got the gig.



3. If you could change careers, what would you be interested in doing?
I would have a Chinese BBQ called Happy Duck on Jefferson Street with ducks, chickens and crispy pork hanging up in the window, a Chinese guy with a cleaver up there chopping away, seven days a week. Open late. Packed with 27-year-old hungry Bohemians.



4. Worst gig ever?
Solo gig at a mom & pop steak house in Frisco, TX. I subbed for a friend. I had never done a solo gig. I had no repertoire. I was reading country standard lyrics out of his notebooks. Songs I had never attempted and never should've. I tried "I Love You More Today than Yesterday" by Spiral Staircase because I knew the melody and thought I could read the words and chords at the same time. But what I didn't realize was how high the vocals would soar at the chorus - out of my range and into the stratosphere. Two lines into that huevo-busting chorus, I had to end the song. But my nervous foot, involuntarily hopping up and down, kept setting off the phony baloney 70's push-button rhythm box. So I had to end it again. A geezer yelled from his table, "YOU GO TO HELL!"



SPIRAL STAIRCASE


5. Best gig ever?
I'm happy to say there are simply far, far too many of those. Sometimes huge and sometimes very intimate, but deeply gratifying. But one among many would be Piano Night at House of Blues a few years back. There were scores of pianists there who could smoke me, pick my bones and toss me out onto the dungheap. I did some originals - good ol' "Spoonbread," "Twenty Years of Trouble," Clifton's "I'm a Farmer" and "Dreamer." I took a bow to a raging, standing ovation, packed from the apron to the balconies, screaming for more.

6. You’re known for playing piano, and we love it, but do you ever get the primal urge to get leathered up, grab a BC Rich Warlock guitar, and quench the steel with some ungodly riffage?
Piano is not exactly a face-melting instrument. But it's a harsh mistress, and more than enough for me to handle.



7. Worst song ever heard?
That song from The Sound of Music where they're performing for the Nazis. It's horrible and gives me reflux, while at the same time, hitting some twisted funny bone. This scene must have influenced your buddy, Quentin.



8. Name a song that has grown on you over the years?
"If I Loved You" from Carousel.



9. Most requested song when doing piano gigs at restaurants and bars?
Honestly, "Bourbon in My Cup” (from Egan’s You Don’t Know Your Mind.)



10. Piano man: Billy Joel? Thoughts? Why do Yankees/northerners Billy Joel so much?
He’s a damn fine singer and piano player. There are truly some lovely songs, but overall, not my cup of tea. Sometimes his songs will rave on and on over an idea that's simply not so good. “Piano Man” is good, but a request for it kind of tells me that the requestor has no imagination or capacity to hear anybody do anything they haven't had passively beat into them for forty years.




11. What’s up with the new record? What’s new? What’s the same? What’s different? Give us your best pitch.
I have fantastical confidence in the new record. It cannot be denied and will be hard for me to ever top. Lil’Buck, Buddy Flett, Bruce MacDonald, Dickie Landry and many others bring their gifts. We recorded and mixed the entire project at Dockside, which was a first. I spent so much that I had to halt production for months at a time, to gather up more money. But it was a good thing, because it gave the creative process a chance to breathe as well. The official release date is June 4th and I don't want KRVS to peak on it before the rest of the world even hears it. I want Cecil Doyle to be the first guy to play it on air. I'm doing a special Jazz Fest "Pre-Release," making it available at Jazz Fest and LA Music Factory. But I'm selling a few off the gigs, and giving away quite a few. So many hipsters and home peeps around here. Gotta take care of my peoples. I kept it under wraps for so long. I can finally start throwing out a few. I think a lot of folks, if they're honest, will say, "Holy Shit."


12. Something no one knows about Dave Egan?I like to watch "Your Health" with the Beckers.


Monday, December 10, 2012

Tarantino Hand-Picks Brother Dege's song for Django Unchained



Brother Dege (“deej”) (aka Dege Legg) is one of the best-kept secrets in the Deep South. A musician, writer and Southern enigma, Dege is the haunted face of 21st century Delta blues. Like the possessed offspring of Faulkner and Son House, he plays slide guitar in the age-old tradition of the blues greats, yet manages to breathe new life into this revered Delta idiom.

Well, make that… was one of the best-kepts secrets… as the reclusive Louisiana Cajun’s song “Too Old To Die Young” was personally selected by Quentin Tarantino to appear in the soundtrack of his new film Django Unchained, starring Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson.

Tarantino describes his method of utilizing music (old and new) into the soundtrack of Django Unchained [from the director's press release]: “I want to thank all the artists who contributed original songs (a first for me) to the picture. Most of these contributions came out of the artists’ own inspiration and their illustration of the film’s soul is invaluable. In addition to the new original songs I am also using a lot of older recordings on the soundtrack – many of which came from my personal vinyl collection. Instead of having the record companies give me new digitally cleaned up versions of these recordings from the ’60s and ’70s, I wanted to use the vinyl I’ve been listening to for years – complete with all the pops and cracks. I even kept the sound of the needle being put down on the record. Basically because I wanted people’s experience to be the same as mine when they hear this soundtrack for the first time.”

The soundtrack for Django Unchained will be released on December 18th before the movie opens on Christmas Day.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO BROTHER DEGE’S “TOO OLD TO DIE YOUNG”


“DJANGO UNCHAINED” SOUNDTRACK LISTING:
1. Winged
2. Django (Main Theme) – Luis Bacalov, Rocky Roberts
3. The Braying Mule – Ennio Morricone
4. In That Case, Django, After You…
5. Lo Chiamavano King (His Name Is King) – Luis Bacalov, Edda Dell’orso
6. Freedom – Anthony Hamilton & Elayna Boynton
7. Five-Thousand-Dollar Nigga’s And Gummy Mouth Bitches
8. La Corsa (2nd Version) – Luis Bacalov
9. Sneaky Schultz and the Demise of Sharp
10. I Got a Name – Jim Croce
11. I Giorni Dell’ira – Riz Ortolani
12. 100 Black Coffins – Rick Ross
13. Nicaragua – Jerry Goldsmith featuring Pat Metheny
14. Hildi’s Hot Box
15. Sister Sara’s Theme – Ennio Morricone
16. Ancora Qui – Ennio Morricone and Elsa
17. Unchained (The Payback/Untouchable) – James Brown and 2Pac
18. Who Did That To You? – John Legend
19. Too Old to Die Young – Brother Dege
20. Stephen The Poker Player
21. Un Monumento – Ennio Morricone
22. Six Shots Two Guns
23. Trinity (Titoli) – Annibale E i Cantori Moderni


Sunday, November 25, 2012

Totem Heart

Here's a photo of a heart
I found
In the trunk of a dead tree
That I cut in Arnaudville, LA.




Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Posthaste vs. Guitarist Jon Sanchez


Singer, songwriter, and crazy-talented guitarist Jon Sanchez has one of the most insane resumes on the planet for a gigging musician. Born and raised in the chemical waste trap of Baton Rouge, LA. Sanchez eventually migrated to NYC, Atlanta, and then Austin in the '90s. Sanchez began his trek into the music world, banging through the hardcore, punk rock wilderness of the 1980s - back when the internet was a Xerox rag and being cool came hard and slow to the low dudes on the totem pole. Sanchez plowed black chowder in No More Fun and later the thrashcore blitzkrieg of Chaos Horde - one of many under-appreciated Louisiana bands way ahead of their time. After a stint as guitarist in hardcore legends Agnostic Front during the mid-80s, Sanchez ping-ponged around various bands from Atlanta to Austin where he fronted The Flying Saucers and Summer Wardrobe. Sanchez currently plays guitar in the touring band for 60s psych legend Roky Erickson (13th Floor Elevators) and buzzes electo-bleeps in his latest musical journey Paraguay.Paraguay play the Wild Salmon in Lafayette, LA on Oct. 25.



~~~ POSTHASTE VS. JON SANCHEZ ~~~

History of Jon Sanchez in five words, more or less? 
Found music, stayed alive, play.
  

Why music? Why not Jon Sanchez: false-proselytizing preacher man?
It was the only thing I wanted to do. 



  
You were a founding member of the legendary, Baton Rouge hardcore/thrash-metal outfit Chaos Horde. What was the craziest gig ya’ll ever played? Didn’t the cops tear gas ya’ll once on Chimes street? Explain. And who’s the most unlikely fan that’s ever approached you, singing the praises of Chaos Horde? 
The craziest Chaos Horde gig was a street party in front of the Ghetto apts. on Chimes street. That was the "tear gas" gig. Somebody through a teargas bomb at us in the middle of our set and everybody thought it was some kind of stage gimmick. People were getting wild and excited until the cloud really hit. Then everybody ran screaming. The most unlikely person to bring up Chaos Horde to me was Phil Anselmo of Pantera and Down. He said that he loved C.H. and wanted me to sing it.


Chaos Horde, Baton Rouge, LA


Chaos Horde / Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/chaoshorde

  


Any other cool memories of the 80s hardcore scene in Baton Rouge? Sloan? Neff? Jacy’s?
Me and Sloan played in No More Fun together for years. He was the most committed and fearless skater I've ever met. Sloan was raw. I knew him when he lived in Austin, but by that time he was on the streets. Oh god, we were so lucky to have Jacy's. Hank cooking duck-neck gumbo in the back for Black Flag on the My War tour? Thanks to Larry Sorehead, I got to open for Ed Sanders of the Fugs there...I'll never forget that. I had read "The Family" and got to ask him about it.


No More Fun, Baton Rouge hardcore




If I remember correctly, you worked as a piano tuner for a while. Weirdest item found inside a client’s piano? 
I was tuning in a federal prison and found a nice, long, sharpened screwdriver hidden in the piano. A dwarf told me to keep it. I still have it. I've found drugs, Polaroids, weapons, you name it. I want to find a little gold in one.







You’ve got the craziest resume of any musician I know. Tell me about your time as a member of Agnostic Front?  Squatting in NYC? Vinnie Stigma? How’d you end up in the band? And what was that like? 
I met the AF guys when we opened for them at Jacy's in '85. A few months later, they asked me to join. "Only if Stigma's cool with that.” I ended up staying with Stigma on Mott St. in the Lower East Side and using his Marshall. Stigma is the coolest, sweetest, guy you could ever meet. Funny thing is, he thought he was getting too old back then...and that was over 25 yrs ago. He's still with AF. The shows were wild and violent. Hammers, guns, pitbulls, skinheads. I squatted with Roger on C &3rd for a while. Rough neighborhood back then. I lasted 2 tours, then moved on. 


Agnostic Front



What was it like playing on Conan or was it Letterman – I can’t remember which – with the Flying Saucers? Do you get hooked up in the green room? 
That was Conan with Abra Moore. It was a great experience! Conan's a good guitar player and jammed for an hour or so when we first got there with Max Weinberg. They all were super cool and treated us well. Conan liked my Casino. The one thing they stressed was "Don't ever, ever play along to Max, EVER.” To this day, I will not.


What happened to the art of the badass riff? When are these bitches going to bring back some AMERICAN STEEL?  
The badass riff is alive and well in America. Those devilish Scandinavians took that game to a whole new level, though. They kill each other.



Do you ever get tired of hearing indie dudes dropping spaghetti arms, lazily strumming cowboy chords and singing about their girlfriends? Don’t you ever feel like saying, “F Art. I must now BRING THE STEEL!”
Yes, I do. Too much man-child. I have the goods, but I'm waiting for this 2012 thing to play out.


When is appropriate to wear emerald encrusted, fringed suede vest?
It's appropriate to pawn that.


What’s the number one rule when jamming with famous guys like Billy Gibbons?
Treat'em like friends and band mates, but don't let him clip his beard over your crotch. It takes forever to get that shit out. 


  
What’s the most profoundly weird thing Roky Erickson has said or done on the road?
He wandered the hallways at night like a ghost. He thought a hammer dulcimer was a BBQ pit being hit with wooden spoons. There's this British writer that wore striped pants and Roky thought he was trying to attack him on stage in various cities.




Roky Erickson


Flashback. First time I dropped acid - it was me, you, and Steve Jacobsen - still in our teens - cruising around in your dad’s Cadillac in Baton Rouge. You remember any wacky details from night? Lot of weird stuff went down.
I remember we saw an old man named Pops die after he'd been hit by a car. We heard a crash and sirens, and finally dared to walk out and see what had happened. Pops was surrounded by paramedics in an inflatable spinal body suit that looked like space age wetsuit to keep his spine intact, but it was too late. He probably died before our eyes. Then we got in the car and “DOA” by Bloodrock came on the radio. Scared me.



Oh man, that was weird! What was the most valuable music industry lesson learned while fronting influential Austin bands The Flying Saucers and later Summer Wardrobe?
Oh, good one! If there's a great indie label that wants you badly, as opposed to a huge label that's interested but not devoted, go with the indie. Can't stress that enough. Always listen to your heart...I mean that. Whenever I didn't, things sucked.


Summer Wardrobe




What’s up with your new band PARAGUAY?
I'm using electronic gear, which is new to me. We roll slow sometimes. Claire Hamilton sings like a bird, George Duron is my brother, and Rudy Eccles came straight out of King Tubby's basement. 




Name one thing no one knows about Jon Sanchez?
I've got a phobia about eating messy food in bright light.






Friday, September 7, 2012

Posthaste with The Howdies


POSTHASTE WITH THE HOWDIES
By Dege Legg

Back when archaeologists first discovered that early cavemen – as well as the remains of mummified Egyptian kings – had pompadours, the whole scene changed – it blew the doors off rutgut outhouses from here to BangBang, TN. Seriously, everybody was, like, “Yes. We knew it all along, but now we can go confidently forward with our Mephistophelian plans for pompadourian domination .” It was great. Life made sense. Men, women, and even children could wear their hair in the pompadour style and not face prosecution or indiscriminate discrimination for their cultural persuasion. The land was free. Church was like a drive-in movie.  And the barley grew like weeds. Then things went back to normal. But for a while it was cool.

Taking their cues from those priceless times are Lafayette’s rockabilly heroes The Howdies. The Howdies play barn-tarding, swampbilly, old school rock & roll. Unfortunately, they've decided to quit while they were ahead and disband, so unless you attend this farewell show, you probably won’t be seeing them for another decade or so.  Since 2007, The Howdies have cranked out potato sacks full of chicken scratch twang. Their songs are a killer mix of hard yarns, polio moons, and drag strip greasers. Bust it hard. And go wish them well on their future journeys through space, time, and sound.


POSTHASTE VS. THE HOWDIES

History of the Howdies in five words, more or less.
Rock too hard for some.

Hard rocking



The genre of rockabilly is a highly competitive genre full of overblown caricatures, faux hillbillies, cartoonish personas. How do you avoid turning into a rodeo clown and still play good music?
You have to have been raised listening to rockabilly and old country. Develop a genuine love for that music. You can tell a Johnny come lately hipster or some rip-off copycat baloney from someone who really "gets it.”





Fill in the blank. Chickenscratch is ______________. 
What you sometimes make at the end of the night or what The Howdies pre-production notebooks looks like.



Who is the creative genius in the Howdies?
Julian Primeaux.

Julian Primeaux. Photo: Denny Culbert

Who is the lazy guy in your band?
There's no room for laziness in The Howdies. We're quitting before it becomes lazy.

What is Howdies' drummer Austin Keller like on the road?
A trooper. Also tries to make a weapon out of everything.

Austin Keller (drums)


Worst gig ever?
Tour 2009. Nashville date. Played on an off night for the venue. Stormy weather. Played to the opening band and their girlfriends (until they split). So after we were alone, we made the best of it by doing the rest of our songs in somewhat of a heavy metal style. Some hipster kid offered for us to stay at his house. It seems he didn't expect us to take him up on his offer (he was doing it for "indie cred")...and he tried to give us the slip when we were following him home. We stayed at his house anyway.

Hipster
Best gig ever?
2010 Conroe Texas Festival. Large festivals shows are always fun.

If Top Gun-era Tom Cruise were in a rockabilly band, what would the name of that band be?
Tommy Cruise and the Jetsetters.


Tommy Cruiser & The Jetsetters

Good rocking tonight

Well played! There are a zillion bands. Why should people care that The Howdies are breaking up?
Because remember all those rowdy, rockin', Roots music bands with energetic stage shows that existed in Lafayette BEFORE The Howdies? .....oh, right.

"Do it for Johnny"

Old Elvis vs. Young Elvis. Why?
Young Elvis.  Why? Simple. Sun Records.


Old Elvis


Young vs. Old Elvi

Who controls the money in your band? Who controls it internationally? Why aren’t there more rockabilly songs about the Illuminati? Slim is the money guy.  Internationally controlled by electronic transfer via ExRay Unlimited. The goth-industrial genre has a lockdown on all songs about the Illuminati. 


Illuminati

December 21, 2012. Post-election economic collapse, DNA upgrade, or business as usual?
All of the above...plus the zombie apocalypse.

Zombie Apocalypse


The Howdies
http://thehowdies.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thehowdies

Denny Culbert: Photographer
http://www.dennyculbert.com/

The Independent:
http://www.theind.com